The Second Step Violence Prevention Program helps children learn skills in the area of empathy, problem solving, impulse control and anger management. The Center has provided training to teachers and others in this curriculum since 1989.

Prevention education programs are available throughout Yellowstone County and surrounding areas.

Prevention Education: Provides teachers and other adults information on recognizing and reporting abuse and neglect as well as information for parents and other adults on protecting children from abuse and neglect.

Second Step and Steps to Respect:  These programs teach children alternatives to violence, as well as help them develop empathy. They help children build healthy relationships, problem solving skills, and self-esteem.

To schedule one or more of these classes at your school or facility, call the Family Tree Center at 252-9799.

Take Action

Take action to support healthy child development and help prevent child abuse and neglect in both big ways and small. Whether you donate financially, participate in one of our fundraising events, or join us by contacting your local office, your contribution makes a difference.

What can you do right now? Anything you do to support kids and parents can help reduce the isolation and stress that often leads to abuse and neglect.

  • Be a friend to a parent you know. Ask how their children are doing. Draw on your own experiences to provide reassurance and support. If a parent seems to be struggling, offer to baby-sit or run errands, or just lend a friendly ear. Show you understand.
  • Be a friend to a child you know. Remember their names. Smile when you talk with them. Ask them about their day at school. Send them a card in the mail. Show you care.
  • Talk to your neighbors about looking out for one another’s children. Encourage a supportive spirit among parents in your apartment building or on your block. Show that you are involved.
  • Give your used clothing, furniture and toys for use by another family. This can help relieve the stress of financial burdens that parents sometimes take out on their kids.
  • Volunteer your time and money for programs in your community that support children and families, such as parent support groups, child care centers, and our state chapters and local Healthy Families America sites.
  • Advocate for public policies, innovative programs and issues that benefit children and families.
Ten Ways to Help Prevent Child Abuse
  • Be a nurturing parent. Children need to know that they are special, loved and capable of following their dreams
  • Help a friend, neighbor or relative. Being a parent isn’t easy. Offer a helping hand take care of the children, so the parent(s) can rest or spend time together.
  • Help yourself. When the big and little problems of your everyday life pile up to the point you feel overwhelmed and out of control – take time out. Don’t take it out on your kid.
  • If your baby cries… It can be frustrating to hear your baby cry. Learn what to do if your baby won’t stop crying. Never shake a baby – shaking a child may result in severe injury or death.
  • Get involved. Ask your community leaders, clergy, library and schools to develop services to meet the needs of healthy children and families.
  • Help to develop parenting resources at your local library. Find out whether your local library has parenting resources, and if it does not, offer to help obtain some.
  • Promote programs in school. Teaching children, parents and teachers prevention strategies can help to keep children safe.
  • Monitor your child’s television, video, and internet viewing/usage. Watching violent films, TV programs, and videos can harm young children.
  • Volunteer at a local child abuse prevention program. For information about volunteer opportunities, call (406) 252-9799.
  • Report suspected abuse or neglect. If you have reason to believe a child has been or may be harmed, call your local department of children and family services or your local police department.